Functionality: How it works

Spellings can be difficult for a number of reasons including silent letters, obscure letter combinations, word length etc. Using a dictionary is not always helpful as it requires knowing the correct initial letters and in the correct order. Trying to use a search engine does not always get the right answer and being presented a list of possible options from the spell-checker when typing in a word processing application can create real uncertainty. All of these can end of leading to you losing your train of thought, creating further frustration.

Two Unique Strategies

Spellementary works by giving an individual two different strategic approaches, better equipping them and developing thinking. It doesn’t attempt to auto-correct or use any algorithm to change the spelling of a misspelt word. Instead, it gives the individual a different, and unique, approach to the problem by working with the ethos “work with what I know” and “not to focus on what I don’t“.

Contains Consecutive Characters

The “Contains Consecutive Characters” search method is useful when a specific part of a word is remembered or recognised. For example, in the word bureaucratically an individual may be 100% certain of ‘crat’. Typing ‘crat’ into the Spellementary search will provide a list of all words that contain ‘crat’, as an exact string, somewhere within their spelling.

An image of the Spellementary interface demonstrating the consecutive characters method.
An image of the Spellementary interface demonstrating the sequential characters method.

Contains Sequential Characters

The “Contains Sequential Characters” search method is useful for when different parts of a word are memorable. For example, in the word onomatopoeia an individual may be 100% certain of the ‘n‘, ‘mat‘ and ‘p‘. Typing ‘nmatp‘ into the Spellementary search will provide a list of all words that contain an ‘n‘, followed by an ‘m‘, followed by an ‘a‘, followed by an ‘t‘ and, lastly, followed by a ‘p‘ within their spelling. The letters do not have to be directly next to each other within the word, only appear in relative sequence to each other.

“Think of sounding out the word and identifying the obvious characters as you go along”